Hon Chemistry 11-20-20 Polymers

HON CHEMISTRY: Oh, my word! We finally finished the chapter! Have you had a chance to check out the Chapter 7 Stuff to Know sheet?

Also amazing – did you realize molecules could be that large? And so many of them! Don’t you think polymers are some pretty unique compounds? Let’s play with them next week!

Some items for contemplation: why are certain plastics recyclable and others not…and what about dishwasher and microwave safe?


Image source: http://www.packtech.ca/pb/images/img32161428fffbe41e07.jpg

Hon Chemistry 11-19-20 Molecular Formulas

HON CHEMISTRY: ANd now you’ve conquered writing molecular formulas! Here’s the lecture from Thursday. It’s just like writing empirical formulas but with a couple of extra steps at the end!

Have you started preparing for the test? It will be over ALL of chapter – plus the small bit from chapter 3. Be sure and checked out the Stuff to Know sheet for all of chapter 7 under the Test Info tab!


flickr photo by Darwin Bell

Hon Chemistry 11-18-20 Empirical Formulas

HON CHEMISTRY: Awesome job today!! You just about figured out how to find empirical formulas all by yourself! I love the way you were able to think through what you knew and what you needed to find a solution!

Be sure and practice – if you don’t it’ll get all turned around and you’ll end up leaving off an important step. The hardest part is that it’s not a set formula for you to plug and play, but if you’ll keep in mind that you’re really just looking for subscripts which are just moles, you’ll be able to think it through. Percent to mass, mass to moles, moles to smallest whole number ratio.

Are you starting to catch on to the steps? It will be good for you to memorize them, but would it not be just tons better to understand why you need each step – backwards and forwards, so then you wouldn’t need to memorize them at all!


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Hon Chemistry 11-17-20 Percent Composition

HON CHEMISTRY: Great job today! Way to apply chemistry to your everyday life!!

I think you’ll find that percent composition problems are super easy to catch on to. First, though, be sure you know which “type” of percent composition you’re trying to fine. Also make sure you can write chemical formulas (I won’t give them to you!) and that you’ve memorized the formulas for acids and those chemical names and formulas for common substances. It’s just plug and play from there! 🙂


flickr photo by Τϊζζ¥

Hon Chemistry 11-13-20 Using Chemical Formulas

HON CHEMISTRY: So the little mole turns out to be a pretty big deal – and a very handy tool!!

Great job today! Here’s discussion on formula mass and molar mass, and then using molar mass and Avogadro’s number as a conversion factor. You’ve got a couple of great tools – so now think through the problems and go forth and conquer!! Be sure and practice them so you don’t forget!


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Hon Chemistry 11-12-20 Moles, Molar Mass & Avogadro’s Number

HON CHEMISTRY: So….you think if his work helped us understand something as significant as the number of something in a mole they might name something after him? They did! Go figure! Another name for the number of anything in a mole is Avogadro’s Number. That would be how many?

You caught on super fast today! Remember, it’s all in terms of one mole. The mass of one mole, the molar mass, is the average atomic mass of the element in grams (periodic table). And the number of atoms in one mole is …. well you know that. Speaking of moles, isn’t he cute? Well, beauty being in the eye of the beholder and all. Hmmmm………


Image source blog.ibts.eu/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/mole2.jpg

Hon Chemistry 11-10-20 Oxidation Numbers

HON CHEMISTRY: So how are the chemical formulas and chemical names coming? With oxidation numbers, you now have a few guidelines to help polish up what you already know!

Oxidation rules! We’ve really already been using oxidation numbers, you just didn’t know it! 🙂


flickr photo by scottwillis

Hon Chemistry 11-4-20 Binary Molecular Formulas

HON CHEMISTRY: Okay, I’m not saying that learning to name and write chemical formulas is as bad as a jellyfish sting (you’ll get that in a minute!), but you do have to really, really pay attention to the details!! Here’s our discussion on writing formulas and names for binary molecular compounds. Part of it’s really similar to what you learned to do for ionic compounds, don’t you think? The other part is totally different, though!

Make sure you keep everything straight. Find a way to organize all the information for yourself so you won’t get confused. Also, don’t forget the lists you have to memorize – chemical names for common substances, polyatomic ions, acids, and numerical prefixes. And practice, practice, practice!!!


Image source casch52

Hon Chemistry 11-3-20 Chemical Formulas with Polyatomic Ions

HON CHEMISTRY: Great job today! Remember it’s like baby steps, first binary ionic compounds, and now, formulas with polyatomic ions. Begin learning them now! And practice, practice, practice!!

Another great idea, click here for a copy of the Hints for Naming Chemical Formulas Flow Chart, or find it under the Worksheet/Handouts Tab. Follow it every time you name chemical formulas!!


flickr photo by skycaptaintwo