Physics 11-19-20 The Work Energy Theorem & Conservation of Energy

PHYSICS: See?! I wasn’t kidding about the balancing rocks movement!

Great job today on making connections between work and energy! I think you’ll like using the work-energy theorem, it’ll save you some time and a couple of steps. Don’t forget about friction!


Photo by Deniz Altindas on Unsplash

Physics 11-18-20 Work & Energy

PHYSICS: Funny thing about words, all this work you thought you’d been doing, was it work after all?

Great job today on making connections between work and energy! I think you’ll like using the work-energy theorem, it’ll save you some time and a couple of steps. Don’t forget about friction!

Physics 11-17-16 Work & Energy from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

flickr photo by *hb19

Physics 11-13-20 A Look Back at Chapter 4 Concepts & Help Session

PHYSICS: Leaves gracefully falling – can you apply concepts from this chapter to explain? Practice, practice practice the problems, but don’t forget the conceptual stuff! Here’s a short look (from last year) at some additional concepts and below that the help session from yesterday morning.

How do parachutes work? What causes whiplash and how do seat belts work? If you get a chance, watch the Julius Sumner Miller videos on Newton’s 2nd law and 3rd law on You Tube. And also, here’s the link to the video clip I showed you on terminal velocity and the Physics of Skydiving I think they’ll all help a lot with the conceptual information


Photo by Sandis Helvigs on Unsplash

Thursday Morning Help Session

PHYSICS 11-11-20 Vertical Fish Forces & Forces with Pulleys and Friction

PHYSICS: Not sure if you’d ever find a fish on an elevator, but you sure could treat the problem like it was! Here a look at the fish on a line problem, and then, a different take on forces – an application of horizontal forces, vertical forces, friction, all at once!

Wow! Amazing job solving these problems – can you now go see if you can solve them by yourself?

Help session tomorrow, 7:30h A.M.


flickr photo by Elisa Dudnikova

Physics 11-6-20 Friction on Inclines

PHYSICS: Who knew snow skiing could be so complicated! Well…friction problems on an incline anyway. Here’s the problem 49 from the homework and then our discussion of friction problems on an incline.

Back to the problems – remember, drawing the diagram is super, super important. Label all the forces and apply the concepts you know about net forces and resultant forces – let it tell you a story. πŸ™‚

Here is some info you might find helpful:
Wed night answers


flickr photo by t i g

Hon Physics 11-5-20 Friction Forces on an Angle Pt 2

PHYSICS: Here’s our look at some of the friction at an angle problems – the ones where you don’t know enough. Also pushing a block on the ceiling – and a life lesson about painting ceilings.


Image source: https://www.fivestarpainting.com/images/blog/shutterstock_25026505.jpg

Physics 11-4-20 Friction & Forces at an Angle

PHYSICS: So what happens to your applied for when you pull or push something at an angle?

Again, remember a few key things. One of the most important – net forces produce acceleration.

You can find Ff a couple of different ways – it’ll be part of a net force equation and can be found from the coefficient of friction equation. If and ONLY if your object is moving at a constant velocity, Ff will equal Fa. Fn is only sometimes equal to Fw. If your object is pulled at any angle (or pushed), Fn will be a part of Fnet in the vertical direction.

Whew! πŸ™‚


flickr photo by kbaird