6th Period Chem Half-Life Simulation Lab

Hey guys – this is where 6th Period Chemistry posts results for the Half-Life Simulation lab. You’ll just list your data from the first data table as a comment – just like you comment every week, except this time you are just listing the data from the first data table.

Don’t forget that your results must be posted by Monday, Jan. 27, by 8:00 A.M. The lab report is due by 8:00 A.M. on Friday, Jan. 31 – save as a PDF to both your Google Drive Chemistry Shared folder AND turnitin.com.

Remember, you don’t have to use candies; you may use coins or anything else that has two sides. Please note that you are to post the number of “radioactive” nuclides remaining after each toss.

Just to clarify, everything on the lab sheets will go in your lab report on that you will post on Google Drive: Title, Objective, Procedure, Observations (with data table), Conclusion, and Questions. Don’t forget that your graph needs to be either a full page graph that you do on Excel or a similar program, or you can draw a full page graph on graph paper, scan a very clean, sharp copy and copy it into your lab report. And don’t forget that the analysis questions, calculations, graph, etc., go after your conclusion.

Happy counting – and wait until AFTER the lab to snack!! πŸ™‚

M&M's
flickr photo by Jared Browarnik

4th Period Chem Half-Life Simulation Lab

Hey guys – this is where 4th Period Chemistry posts results for the Half-Life Simulation lab. You’ll just list your data from the first data table as a comment – just like you comment every week, except this time you are just listing the data from the first data table.

Don’t forget that your results must be posted by Monday, Jan. 27, by 8:00 A.M. The lab report is due by 8:00 A.M. on Friday, Jan. 31 – save as a PDF to both your Google Drive Chemistry Shared folder AND turnitin.com.

Remember, you don’t have to use candies; you may use coins or anything else that has two sides. Please note that you are to post the number of “radioactive” nuclides remaining after each toss.

Just to clarify, everything on the lab sheets will go in your lab report on that you will post on Google Drive: Title, Objective, Procedure, Observations (with data table), Conclusion, and Questions. Don’t forget that your graph needs to be either a full page graph that you do on Excel or a similar program, or you can draw a full page graph on graph paper, scan a very clean, sharp copy and copy it into your lab report. And don’t forget that the analysis questions, calculations, graph, etc., go after your conclusion.

Happy counting – and wait until AFTER the lab to snack!! πŸ™‚

M&M's
flickr photo by Jared Browarnik

3rd Period Chem Half-Life Simulation Lab

Hey guys – this is where 3rd Period Chemistry posts results for the Half-Life Simulation lab. You’ll just list your data from the first data table as a comment – just like you comment every week, except this time you are just listing the data from the first data table.

Don’t forget that your results must be posted by Monday, Jan. 27, by 8:00 A.M. The lab report is due by 8:00 A.M. on Friday, Jan. 31 – save as a PDF to both your Google Drive Chemistry Shared folder AND turnitin.com.

Remember, you don’t have to use candies; you may use coins or anything else that has two sides. Please note that you are to post the number of “radioactive” nuclides remaining after each toss.

Just to clarify, everything on the lab sheets will go in your lab report on that you will post on Google Drive: Title, Objective, Procedure, Observations (with data table), Conclusion, and Questions. Don’t forget that your graph needs to be either a full page graph that you do on Excel or a similar program, or you can draw a full page graph on graph paper, scan a very clean, sharp copy and copy it into your lab report. And don’t forget that the analysis questions, calculations, graph, etc., go after your conclusion.

Happy counting – and wait until AFTER the lab to snack!! πŸ™‚

M&M's
flickr photo by Jared Browarnik

Chemistry 1-20-20 Properties of Radioactive Isotopes & Radioactive Decay

CHEMISTRY: Great job today with nuclear equations! Today we finished talking about the properties of radioactive nuclides, and then it was all about types of nuclear decay and nuclear equations and arrows and where to put them! πŸ™‚

HOMEWORK UPDATE FOR THURSDAY (Due Friday): Pg. 672 – 674; 21, 26 – 33, 40, 42

So how did you do with the nuclear equations today? Make sure you know what side of the arrow to put the particle on! Also, make sure you memorize the nuclear symbols for alpha particles, beta particles (electrons), positrons, neutrons, and protons – those are just as important as the arrow!


Photo by Gaelle Marcel

Chemistry 1-21-20 Properties of Radioactive Isotopes

CHEMISTRY: So ordinarily it looks like just any old hunk of rock, but this is a picture of uranium ore under UV light. Pretty cool, huh?!? Here’s our beginning discussion of the unique properties of radioactive nuclides, and a head start at looking at nuclear equations.

HW UPDATE FOR MONDAY:
3rd Period: Pg. 672 – 674; 11 – 21, 30 – 33, 40, 42
4th, 6th, 7th Periods: No homework, the assignment will be moved to Thursday night.

Have you looked over the half-life simulation lab? It’s one of easiest labs you’ve done, but it does require that you READ the instructions on the syllabus and the website. If there is something you don’t understand, I’ll be glad to help!

Hon Chemistry 1-21-20 Blocks of the Periodic Table & Noble Gas Notation

HON CHEMISTRY: Wow! You learned a lot today! Don’t we serve an awesome God?!? You probably knew the periodic table was really organized, but did you realize that it was THAT organized? Awesome!

Practice what you’ve learned!! You’ll get the hang of it and be as laid back as this “noble” fellow in no time! πŸ˜‰


flickr photo by Rennett Stowe

Chemistry 1-17-20 Intro to Radioactivity

CHEMISTRY: Great start to a new chapter! I think you’ll be surprised how much nuclear chemistry is already a part of your everyday life. Also now you know where E=mc2 came from!!

By the way, you ought to read about the life of Marie Cure when you get a chance. Fascinating woman of science with an incredible story!

Hon Chemistry 1-17-20 Orbital Notation & Electron Configuration Notation

HON CHEMISTRY: Wow, you did a great job today! Did quantum numbers begin making more sense when you started using them? Good work today on orbital notation. I think you’re going to be seeing arrows and numbers in your sleep!

And then, just when you were getting the hang of drawing arrows, I go and change it! But don’t you think writing electron configuration notation is a whole lot shorter than doing orbital notation? Don’t get me wrong, knowing how to do orbital is great for seeing how the electrons are paired, but this way is waaaay shorter!

Be sure and practice with the homework tonight, and don’t forget to use the Aufbau “chart”! Let me know if you figure out the riddle!!


flickr photo by Iguana Jo