Hon Chemistry 10-17-11 Moles, Molar Mass & Avogadro’s Number

HON CHEMISTRY: Hey guys, here’s the lecture from Monday on moles, molar mass, and Avogadro’s number. Remember, it’s all in terms of one mole. The mass of one mole, the molar mass, is the average atomic mass of the element in grams (periodic table). And the number of atoms in one mole is …. well you know that. Speaking of moles, isn’t he cute? Well, beauty being in the eye of the beholder and all. Hmmmm………


Image source blog.ibts.eu/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/mole2.jpg

Hon Chemistry 10-13-11 Chemical Formulas Encore

HON CHEMISTRY: So is it a little clearer now? Did today’s review help? Here’s today’s review, just in case you need to save it for the future. Also, if you need a little more guided practice – help session tomorrow morning at 7:15! How’s the worksheet coming? A covalent compound means the same thing as a molecular compound – don’t let that mess you up. You’re doing great!! πŸ™‚

Chemistry 10-13-11 Mixture Separation Lab

Wow! It’s been a pretty intense couple of days, huh? I’m really, really proud of you! It’s a good thing to be able to follow a set of directions, but an absolutely TREMENDOUS thing to be able to figure out how to solve a problem on your own! That’s a difficult thing to learn how to do, and you are doing a great job developing that skill. Any questions about writing up the lab report for Monday? Use the Lab Report manuscript form you can find here or on Edline. Remember, some of you definitely need to elaborate on your procedure! Also, you’ll have the data table that is in your book, and then include your own observations of each step you did after the data table. And then, after you write your own conclusion, don’t forget the questions on page 27 of your book: Conclusion questions 1 – 2, and Extension questions 1 – 2. And, hey, we get to start a new chapter tomorrow!!


Image source http://www.gourmetnut.com/sea-salts/cyprus-flake-salt.html

Hon Chemistry 10-11-11 Binary Molecular Formulas & Oxidation Numbers

HON CHEMISTRY: Well, how are the chemical formulas coming? I think you’re doing pretty good on writing the formulas, but what about naming compounds? Help session? Don’t forget to add a few more things to your “make sure you memorize for the test” list: binary acids, oxyacids, prefixes, and oxidation rules. Oxidation rules! We’ve really already been using oxidation numbers, you just didn’t know it! πŸ™‚

Since the recording is acting up, I’ve posted an old lecture, but I’ll put this year’s thrilling lecture up if it ever cooperates! πŸ˜‰


flickr photo by scottwillis

Hon Chemistry 10-4-11 Formulas with Polyatomic Ions & Binary Molecular Formulas

HON CHEMISTRY: Are you starting to see numbers in your sleep? Here’s the lecture from Monday on writing chemical formulas with polyatomic ions, and also an intro to binary molecular formulas. The same, but different……huh? Tons of memorization for this chapter – monatomic ions, polyatomic ions, prefixes, and this is just the beginning. Good luck, and keep practicing!!!


flickr photo by designwallah

Physics Test on Chapter 3, 2-D Motion

PHYSICS: So you ready for that test tomorrow? Since the help session isn’t until tomorrow morning, I thought I’d go ahead and post a couple of old reviews on the homework and worksheet problems (2 different vodcasts from last year). Don’t forget what you should do to start – Draw a picture, write what you know, resolve the resultant velocity into vertical and horizontal if you need to, and find formulas that fit (because it will hardly ever be solved with just one) and go for it!!

If you are talking angular projectiles, the resultant velocity is actually made up of two things – horizontal velocity and vertical velocity. The horizontal velocity never changes, the vertical velocity has a different direction going up and coming down, but it has the same speed at equal levels. If you’re talking horizontal projectiles, the resultant velocity is the same as the horizontal velocity of the gun, because that’s the only kind of initial velocity it has! Relative motion is even easier – just use the Pythagorean theorem and tangent, and use horizontal to find horizontal and vertical to find vertical. Good luck!!


flickr photo by Felipe Skroski



flickr photo by f-l-e-x

Physics Help Session Wednesday Morning, 7:15 A.M.

And I promise not to start with the really hard problems this time! How’re the problems going? You can do this!! If you are talking angular projectiles, the resultant velocity is actually made up of two things – horizontal velocity and vertical velocity. The horizontal velocity never changes, the vertical velocity has a different direction going up and coming down, but it has the same speed at equal levels. Now, if you’re talking horizontal projectiles, the resultant velocity is the same as the horizontal velocity of the gun, because that’s the only kind of initial velocity it has!

Draw a picture, write what you know, resolve the resultant velocity into vertical and horizontal, find formulas that fit (because it will hardly ever be solved with just one) and go for it!! Capisce? πŸ™‚ Oh, by the way – don’t forget the conceptual stuff!