Chemistry 8-26-13 Derived Units & Density Problems

CHEMISTRY – So you think Goodman Road is getting crowded? How’s this for a “high density” city? Great job on the density problems today! Remember, in chemistry we use math as a tool, therefore we might work problems a little differently in chemistry than you do in your math class.

When working these problems, don’t forget to follow the problem solving steps we discussed today:

  • Analyze – write down what you’re given and what you’re looking for
  • Plan – write a formula where you isolate the unknown on one side by itself
  • Compute – plug in your data, numbers and units; then cancel the units, and if they cancel correctly, go on to the calculator. Be sure and give your answer what the correct units.
  • Evaluate – does your answer make sense, have you used the correct units, do you have the correct sig figs?

Wait – scratch that last thing, we’ll do sig figs tomorrow. Speaking of tomorrow, any questions about the thLAB: SI Scavenger Hunt? Bring your questions tomorrow and I’ll be glad to help!

 

CHEMISTRY 9-26-13 Derived Units & Density from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

flickr photo by chromogenic

Hon Chemistry 8-26-13 Density

HONORS CHEMISTRY – Hey guys, here’s a pic of some “high density” koi that I saw in Hawaii (at the Dole Pineapple Plantation, of all places!). Great job with the density problems – be sure and practice them tonight using the format I showed you in class today.

On a more practical side – and even better(!), can you now use what you’ve learned about density? Be sure and print off a copy of the lab, ID of an Unknown off the website. Who is going to be your spokesperson? Can’t wait to “watch” you work!

HON CHEMISTRY 8-26-13 Density from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

Chemistry 8-26-11 SI Derived Units

CHEMISTRY – So you thought Goodman Road was getting crowded! How’s this for a “high density” city? Here’s the lecture from Friday on derived SI units. Great job on the density problems today! Remember, in chemistry we use math as a tool, therefore we might work problems a little differently in chemistry than you do in your math class. I think you’ve done a lot of this already, but make sure you understand the conceptual side of density as well!

When working these problems, don’t forget to follow the problem solving steps we discussed today. Analyze – write down what you’re given and what you’re looking for, plan – write a formula where you isolate the unknown on one side by itself, compute – plug in your data, numbers and units. Then cancel the units, and if they cancel correctly, go on to the calculator. Be sure and give your answer what the correct units. And finally, evaluate – does your answer make sense, have you used the correct units, do you have the correct sig figs? Wait – scratch that last thing, we’ll do sig figs in a couple of days. You’ll just have to wait! πŸ™‚


flickr photo by chromogenic

Hon Chemistry 8-25-11 Derived Units

HONORS CHEMISTRY – Hey guys, here’s a pic of high density koi that I saw in Hawaii (at the Dole Pineapple Plantation, of all places!). So do you feel comfortable with the derived units/formulas that we discussed? Here’s the lecture from Thursday. Be sure and practice the density problems and let me know Monday how you’re doing with them. Let’s see if you can do some practical things with density tomorrow!

Physics 8-24-11 Human Density Lab

PHYSICS: Great job guys – who knew water displacement could be so much fun! πŸ˜‰ Thanks Kamren and Matt!! Good job moppers, and fillers, and counters, and recorders! Now for the lab report. Remember to include that final question in your conclusion – “So why can’t some humans float?” And don’t forget – I’m very, very interested in your experimental design, i. e., how’d you gather your data, how are you presenting your data, sig figs, calculations, etc. Water, water, everywhere!