Hon Chemistry 11-15-17 Intro to Atomic Theory

HON CHEMISTRY: So how do you feel about being made from earth, air, water, and fire? Here’s the very short intro we did on how we ended up with the atomic theory. Had you ever heard of Lavosier, Proust, and Dalton?

And how did you do with your comparison of Dalton’s Atomic Theory with the Modern Atomic Theory? Could you discuss it in more detail at a later date??

Hon Chemistry 11-14-17 Chapter 7 Test Overview

HONORS CHEMISTRY: God bless you as you study for the test! Here’s our overview of the test from today. Also, right below today’s lesson, I’m posting a vodcast from a help session last year – writing and naming chemical formulas- just in case you might feel the need for another look…

Have you been using the “Chapter 7 Stuff to Know & Know How to Do” sheet? It’s a great way to get organized in studying for the test. I know it seems like a lot, but you can do it!

First priority – make sure that you have memorized EVERYTHING. Then, go to sciencegeek.net and make sure you can write and name chemical formulas. Practice, practice, practice!!! Then start practicing the different kinds of problems – do at least three of each one of them. And also try those on sciencegeek.net. That’s always some good practice. God bless – I’ll be praying for you!


Photo by Alexandre Chambon on Unsplash

Hon Chemistry 11-11-16 Chemical Formulas Help Session

Hon Chemistry 11-11-16 Help Session from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

Hon Chemistry 11-9-17 Polymers

HON CHEMISTRY: Oh, my word! We finally finished the chapter! Have you had a chance to check out the Chapter 7 Stuff to Know sheet?

Also amazing – did you realize molecules could be that large? And so many of them! Don’t you think polymers are some pretty unique compounds? Let’s play with them tomorrow!

Some items for contemplation: why are certain plastics recyclable and others not…and what about dishwasher and microwave safe?


Image source: http://www.packtech.ca/pb/images/img32161428fffbe41e07.jpg

Hon Chemistry 11-7-17 Empirical & Molecular Formulas

HON CHEMISTRY: Awesome job today!! You just about figured out how to find an empirical formula all by yourself! I love the way you were able to think through what you knew and what you needed to find a solution!

Be sure and practice – if you don’t it’ll get all turned around and you’ll end up leaving off an important step. The hardest part is that it’s not a set formula for you to plug and play, but if you’ll keep in mind that you’re really just looking for subscripts which are just moles, you’ll be able to think it through. Percent to mass, mass to moles, moles to smallest whole number ratio.

Are you starting to catch on to the steps? It will be good for you to memorize them, but would it not be just tons better to understand why you need each step – backwards and forwards, so then you wouldn’t need to memorize them at all!

And then, also remember what molecular formulas are – just a multiple of the empirical formula. Keep that concept in mind, and you’ll have no problem remembering to divide the molecular formula mass by the empirical formula mass to find X! Easy peasy! ๐Ÿ™‚


flickr photo by Darwin Bell

Hon Chemistry 11-3-17 Percent Composition

HON CHEMISTRY: Great job today! Way to apply chemistry to your everyday life!!

I think you’ll find that percent composition problems are super easy to catch on to. First, though, be sure you know which “type” of percent composition you’re trying to fine. Also make sure you can write chemical formulas (I won’t give them to you!) and that you’ve memorized the formulas for acids and those chemical names and formulas for common substances. It’s just plug and play from there! ๐Ÿ™‚


flickr photo by ฮคฯŠฮถฮถยฅ

Hon Chemistry 10-31-17 Mass to Moles to Molecules

HON CHEMISTRY: So what do you think is the mass of a mole of skittles? Awesome job today using a chemical formula as a tool!

It turns out there are tons of ways that you can use a chemical formula! Like finding molar mass, moles, and maybe how many skittles are in a mole of skittles? Let’s practice it tomorrow!

P. S. Did you realize how super important it’s going to be for you to be able to correctly write chemical formulas (and memorize all that formula stuff)?!?


flickr photo by A Elizabeth

Hon Chemistry 10-27-17 Moles, Molar Mass & Avogadro’s Number

HON CHEMISTRY: So….you think if his work helped us understand something as significant as the number of something in a mole they might name something after him? They did! Go figure! Another name for the number of anything in a mole is Avogadro’s Number. That would be how many?

You caught on super fast today! Remember, it’s all in terms of one mole. The mass of one mole, the molar mass, is the average atomic mass of the element in grams (periodic table). And the number of atoms in one mole is …. well you know that. Speaking of moles, isn’t he cute? Well, beauty being in the eye of the beholder and all. Hmmmm………


Image source blog.ibts.eu/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/mole2.jpg

Hon Chemistry 10-25-17 Oxidation Numbers & Help Session

HON CHEMISTRY: So how are the chemical formulas and chemical names coming? With oxidation numbers, you now have a few guidelines to help polish up what you already know!

And don’t forget to add one more thing to your “make sure you memorize for the test” list: polyatomic ions, chemical names and formulas for common substances, binary acids, oxyacids, prefixes, and from today oxidation rules. Oxidation rules! We’ve really already been using oxidation numbers, you just didn’t know it! ๐Ÿ™‚

But does it all matter? These complicated rules about naming compounds, I mean. Let’s find out tomorrow in lab!


flickr photo by scottwillis