Chemistry 11-30-17 Molecular Formulas

CHEMISTRY: Hey guys! Awesome job with empirical formulas, and now you’ve conquered writing molecular formulas! Here’s the lecture for Thursday. It’s just like writing empirical formulas but with a twist at the end!

By the way, if you’d like some practice or if you have questions, holler and we can have a help session!

We are getting very close to the end of the chapter! Have you started preparing for the test? It will be over ALL of chapter – plus the small bit from chapter 3. Be sure and checked out the Stuff to Know sheet for all of chapter 7 on Edline!

Chemistry 11-12-15 Molecular Formulas from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

flickr photo by Sebastian Mary

Hon Chemistry 11-30-17 Properties of Radioactive Isotopes & Radioactive Decay

HON CHEMISTRY: Can you guess what it is?/ It’s a picture of uranium ore under UV light. Cool, huh! Here’s the lecture for Thursday on the properties of radioactive nuclides and the types of radioactive decay. bEGIN WATCHING THE VODCAST AT 5:23 MINUES.

This lesson includes info on how to write nuclear equations. Don’t forget to memorize the nuclear symbols for alpha particles, beta particles (electrons), positrons, neutrons, and protons. Not nearly as bad as polyatomic ions, huh?!?
🙂

Great start on half-life problems today! I love the way you were able to figure them out yourselves!! Let’s play with them some more tomorrow! Calculators ready!!

HON CHEMISTRY 11-21-13 Properties of Radioactive Nuclides & Nuclear Equations from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

Physics 11-30-17 Simple Machines

PHYSICS: Did you remember this stuff on simple machines from your physical science days? I don’t think you’ll have any trouble with efficiency and mechanical advantage problems. Give them a whirl and let me know!

How do you think the efficiencies of machines compare? Could you design a method to test that? You don’t need no stinkin’ lab sheets! Do you?
🙂

Physics 11-20-15 Simple Machines from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

flickr photo by André Banyai

Hon Chemistry 11-29-17 Intro to Radioactivity

HON CHEMISTRY: Welcome to nuclear chemistry! No, really – I think you’ll be surprised how much nuclear chemistry is already a part of your everyday life. And now you know where E=mc2 came from!!

Here’s the lecture for Wednesday on a bit of the “history” of radioactivity. By the way, when you get a chance, read about the life of Marie Cure – fascinating woman of science with an incredible story!

Chemistry 1-5-15 Intro to Radioactivity from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

Chemistry 11-29-17 Empirical Formulas

CHEMISTRY: So, would you like to be Greg on CSI? Here’s the lecture for Wednesday. Great start on empirical formulas today!

The hardest part is that it’s not a set formula for you to plug and play, but if you’ll keep in mind that you’re really just looking for subscripts which are just moles, you’ll be able to think it through. Percent to mass, mass to moles, moles to smallest whole number ratio.

Tomorrow we’ll talk about a little step you get to add at the end. 🙂

CHEMISTRY 11-11-15 Empirical Formulas from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

Image source www.dnr.mo.gov/env/esp/images/prettytesttubes.jpg

Physics 11-28-17 The Work Energy Theorem & Conservation of Energy

PHYSICS: See?! I wasn’t kidding about the balancing rocks movement!

Great job today on making connections between work and energy! I think you’ll like using the work-energy theorem, it’ll save you some time and a couple of steps. Don’t forget about friction!


Photo by Deniz Altindas on Unsplash

Hon Chemistry 11-28-17 Isotopes & Average Atomic Mass

HON CHEMISTRY: Awwww….aren’t they cute! So what do you think the average atomic mass of puppies is?

Here’s our discussion for Tuesday on isotopes and calculating the average atomic mass of isotopes. Isotopes…. not puppies. 🙂


flickr photo by Xanboozled

Chemistry 11-28-17 Percent Composition

CHEMISTRY: Great job today… a little bit different lab procedure, huh?!! This lab is answered only on notebook paper – be careful to show correct data and calculations!

BTW – I think you’ll find that percent composition problems are really easy to catch on to. Make sure, though, you can write chemical formulas (I won’t give them to you!) and that you’ve memorized the formulas for acids and those chemical names for common substances so that you’ll have something to find the percent composition of!


flickr photo by Τϊζζ¥

Hon Chemistry 11-27-17 Structure of the Atom

HON CHEMISTRY: Were you able to follow the connections the scientists made as they discovered the structure of the atom? Here’s the lecture from today. Do you think there could be anything smaller than protons, neutrons, and electrons? Hmmmmm……

Make sure you know the name of the scientists, the name of their experiments, be able to draw a diagram of their experiment, and describe how they interpreted the experimental results that led to their discoveries.

Don’t forget about the video clip we watched in class – and I’ve included a couple extra ones. they’ll help you review the different experiment that the guys like Thompson and Rutherford did. Click here for the video on the Cathode Ray Tube Experiment that Thompson did, and also for a little history on The Discovery of the Electron. Here’s the other one on The Discovery of the Nucleus.

By the way – how do you feel about playing scientist last week? How is what you did similar to the work of early scientists in discovering the structure of the atom?


flickr photo by Here’s Kate