God bless you as you study for your chemistry, honors chemistry, and physics exams! How are you studying? Best advice? Practice, practice, PRACTICE! Be active in studying – don’t just read over the material. Review games on the online textbook, reworking old homework problems, re-working those flash cards you’ve made – all good. Watching vodcasts of old lectures might not hurt either!

Here are the room assignments for Tuesday’s exam:
Hon Chemistry Rm. 301 (Ms. DeFrehn’s room)
Chemistry 2 Rm. 302 (Mr. Wilson’s room)
Chemistry 4 Rm. 303 (Mrs. Tapp’s room)
Chemistry 6 Rm. 304 (Coach Henderson’s room)
Chemistry 7 Rm. 303 (Mrs. Tapp’s room)
Physics Rm. 301 (Ms. DeFrehn’s room)

Don’t forget to bring your completed exam review packets when you come on Tuesday. Click below for a copy, if you need it. I’m praying for you!!

CHEMISTRY Exam Review Packet

HONORS CHEMISTRY Exam Review Packet

PHYSICS Exam Review Packet

easy button

flickr photo by Bravo213

CHEMISTRY: God bless you as you study for your test! Here’s the overview of the test from today and the practice we did. Do you need any extra practice? Help session tomorrow morning at 7:15ish.

Have you checked out the Chapter 3 Study Suggestion sheet on Edline? Great way to make sure you’ve covered everything!

Also, don’t forget about the video clips that I want you to watch – it’s a great way to review the scientists from the chapter and their experiments. Click here for the video on the Cathode Ray Tube Experiment that Thompson did, and also for the video clips that I want you to watch on The Discovery of the Electron and The Discovery of the Nucleus. All of these will be great tools in studying for the test!

Worst thing you can do? Just read over your notes – even if you do it a million times. Best thing to do? Practice! Take your notes and make practice test questions with different colored highlighters. Practice the memorization by making quizzes for yourself. Practice working the average atomic mass problems, practice using isotope symbols to find protons, neutrons, electrons, AND practice writing and naming chemical formulas! Good luck studying – I’ll be praying for you!

CHEMISTRY Ch 3 Test Overview from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

Image source Wordle.net

CHEMISTRY: Isn’t God awesome to give us minds to understand the world around us – even the parts we can’t see!

Can you believe atoms are that small – and the nucleus even waaaaaay smaller! The thumbnail is a picture of atoms from the IBM Almaden Research Center. These are iron atoms on top of copper. Being able to move atoms around like this was a giant leap in the field of nanotechnology! (Sorry about that, bad pun! :) )

Here’s the lecture from Monday on atomic number and isotopes. It’s the last lecture for this chapter – and for this year!!

How are you doing on writing nuclear symbols? Also make sure you can use them to determine the number of protons, neutrons, electrons, etc., AND be sure you can use the formula to find average atomic mass! Happy calculating on the problems for tonight.

Oh, any questions about the Carbon Isotope Mini-Project?

CHEMISTRY 12-8-14 Isotopes & Average Atomic Mass from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

Image source IBM Almaden Research Center

HON CHEMISTRY: Happy Test Day tomorrow!! Here’s the overview that we did on tomorrow’s test. Be careful and don’t take the test for granted! It will cover the beginning part of chapter 3 (through average atomic mass), chapter 21, and you will also have a set of chemical formulas to write and name. For more specific written details, check out the posts from November 17 & 18 and the Chapter 3 & Chapter 21 Stuff to Know sheets on Edline.

How’s your own “stuff to know & know how to do” list coming? You should be making one of those for each test now!

Could you use some extra practice? Help session tomorrow morning – 7:15ish A.M. And finally, practice everything! And did I mention, PRACTICE!! I’ll be praying for you!

HON CHEMISTRY 12-8-14 Overview of Ch 3a & 21 Test from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

CHEMISTRY – Chocolate chip cookie dough model of the atom? Here’s the lecture from Friday on how scientists began to determine the structure of the atom and the existence of subatomic particles. For each, make sure you know the name of the scientists, the name of their experiments, be able to draw a diagram of their experiment, and describe how they interpreted the experimental results that led to their discoveries. Wow, that’s a mouthful!

By the way, don’t forget about the video clips that I want you to watch! Click here for the video on the Cathode Ray Tube Experiment that Thompson did, and also for the video clips that I want you to watch on The Discovery of the Electron and The Discovery of the Nucleus. All of these will be great tools in studying for the test!

Any questions about the Carbon Isotope Mini-Project? Here is where you will post your questions and read the answers we talk about for the project. When you comment you can check the box to be notified if anyone else comments – that way you can know if I answer or if someone else asks a question.

CHANGE IN PLANS: Homework for Friday night is changed to Pg. 86 – 88: 7 – 11 and 34. Change the instructions for #11 to read, “… write BOTH the hyphen notation AND the nuclear symbols for the isotopes below.” Also, I want you to have plenty of time with the isotope problems, so I’m moving the test to Wednesday, December 10. This means that the due date for the Carbon Isotope Mini-Project is changed to Thursday, December 11.
:)

December05 1006 c2 2014 from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

flickr photo by pixxiestails

HON CHEMISTRY: Radioactive isotopes all around! Did you ever dream there were so many applications of radioactivity? This is a pic of a test used to check on blood flow through the heart during a stress test. Fun, huh!?

We’ve almost wrapped up the chapter! Here’s our discussion on uses of radioactive isotopes, pt. 2, and fission. Now let’s go play with tomorrow! Kinda… :)

How are you doing on studying for the test? It will cover the beginning part of chapter 3 (through average atomic mass), chapter 21, and you will most probably also have a set of chemical formulas to write and name.

For chapter 3, check out the Chapter 3a Stuff to Know & Study Suggestions sheet.

For chapter 21, make sure you practice half-life problems and nuclear equations. Also, make sure you’ve memorize the nuclear symbols for alpha particles, beta particles, positrons, neutrons, and protons. And then there are tons of notes on the conceptual stuff. Properties of radioactivity, people, types of radioactive decay, applications of radioactivity, definitions, definitions, and definitions!

HON CHEMISTRY 12-4-14 Applications of Radioactive Isotopes, Pt. 2 &Fission from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

Image source http://www.cedars-sinai.edu

PHYSICS – Now this is a lot of grocery carts! I’m not going to even think about how much work would be done in moving them!

Here’s the vodcast of the work we did today on the problems and questions from the Chapter 5 Worksheet 2. I love, love, the way you were thinking through the problems!!!

Help session tomorrow morning at 7:15ish A.M. God bless you as you continue to prepare for the test! I’m praying for you!!!

PHYSICS 12-4-14 Chapter 5 Review Worksheet 2 from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

flickr photo by mischiru

________________________________________

HON CHEMISTRY: Hey guys – this is where honors chemistry will post results for the Half-Life Simulation lab. You’ll just list your data from the first data table as a comment – just like you comment every week, except this time you are just listing the data from the first data table.

Remember, you don’t have to use candies; you may use coins or anything else that has two sides. Please note that you are to post the number of “radioactive” nuclides remaining after each toss.

Just to clarify, everything on the lab sheets will go in your lab report on that you will submit as a PDF to Google Drive and TurnItIn.com – Title, Objective, Procedure, Observations (with data table), Conclusion, and Questions. Don’t forget that your graph needs to be either a full page graph that you do on Excel or a similar program, or you can draw a full page graph on graph paper, scan a very clean, sharp copy and copy it into your lab report. And don’t forget that the analysis questions, calculations, graph, etc., go after your conclusion.

Happy counting – and wait until AFTER the lab to snack!! :)

M&M's
flickr photo by Jared Browarnik

_______________________________

PHYSICS: So it’s official – the test will be Friday, and the machines lab will be moved to next Monday. The first vodcast below is the review of the problems from today’s help session (#46 – crate pulled up the incline from the machines homework and #47 – ski acrobat from chapter 5). Below that are the problems we did in class (#22 – circus monkey on the incline, #21 – diver steps off a diving board, and #46 – a skier is pulled up a slope).

PHYSICS 12-3-14 Help Session: #46 – A Crate and #47 – An Acrobat on Skiis from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

flickr photo by William Hall

…and from today’s class:

PHYSICS 12-3-14 #22 – A Circus Monkey, #21 – A Diver, and #46 – A Skier from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

flickr photo by SabrinaDay Photo

HON CHEMISTRY: Wow! Did you realize radiation was everywhere? It turns out there are some pretty useful applications of radioactivity! Let’s finish talking about that tomorrow.

HON CHEMISTRY 12-3-14 Applications of Radioactive Isotopes, Pt. 1 from Tammy Skinner on Vimeo.

Photo by Steve Jabo, NMNH.

  • Our World

  • December 2014
    S M T W T F S
    « Nov    
     123456
    78910111213
    14151617181920
    21222324252627
    28293031  
  • What You’re Saying

  • LAB PICS

    www.flickr.com
    This is a Flickr badge showing items in a set called Chemistry 2010-2011. Make your own badge here.
Subscribe

Follow this blog

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.